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BHER Speaker Series - Shared screen with speaker view
Madineh
35:57
this is my pleasure dear sherry.
Zainab Mohamed
38:42
Am very proud to hear from my friend, mentor, section mate Dahabo
Balqeys mohamed
45:09
Dahabo very wonderful presentation thanks.
Molade Osibodu (she/her/hers)
46:45
We will have time for Q&A so please do note the questions arising for you. You can also type them in the chat if you prefer. Thank you all for being here.
zainab bishar
46:50
pleasure to hear the summary made by Dahabo thanks for presenting us
Isnina
48:20
Dahab good presentation I appreciate you thanks
Michele
49:25
For CRS students enrolled in the certificate and diploma programs, you can sign the attendance form here: https://crs1.apps01.yorku.ca/machform/view.php?id=32440 The password is BHER
Marcela Duran
49:28
congratulations Dahabo. very informative presentation
Jodie Chinnery
49:39
how young are the girls being impacted by early marriage, forced marriage, early pregnancies etc? Further, what are the best ways we in the West can do to help?
Sasan Heidarzadeh
55:17
I was logged out and had to log in back again. Could you please send the link for diploma students again?
Rachel Silver
57:13
For CRS students enrolled in the certificate and diploma programs, you can sign the attendance form here: https://crs1.apps01.yorku.ca/machform/view.php?id=32440 The password is BHER
Molade Osibodu (she/her/hers)
57:41
“The woman child is always disadvantaged” - Dr. Priscilla Ndegwa
Zainab Mohamed
59:04
strong woman if supported much can do better than others
Zainab Mohamed
01:00:04
we also encourage our women child to do their best
joy williams
01:00:42
I missed the PowerPoint with the first presentation. can you email to me please?
Rachel Silver
01:01:30
Hi Joy—the event recording will be posted on the Speaker Series website by this afternoon: https://www.yorku.ca/edu/reciprocal-learning-in-times-of-crisis/
zainab bishar
01:01:37
most people lost jobs the woman in the university or her husband this also led to unrest in some families , you find that some ladies were divorced or either the man remarry because they feel the girl education waste a lot of time needed for procreation hence this pressure is also there
Zainab Mohamed
01:07:49
great point Zainab, my name
Mirco Stella
01:08:12
While important to emphasize the aspects/dimensions of the challenges that are shared and common to women and young girls in the global south, in attending education - especially during the pandemic. It is just as important to consider some of the elements that are unique to the camps, as stressed in some of the points made by Ms. Dahabo Ibrahim. Here, the "spectre of rightlessness", increases the vulnerability of women and young girls. This spectre manifests itself quite well in the unilateral decision by NGOs and educational institutions in the camps to simply reduce teachers to 3 per school - framed in the discourse of budgetary concerns.In this sense, while strategies such as awareness and mobilization on the level of civil society may work (with limits of course) in a context of national citizenship, I wonder about the ways in which postsecondary actors may support more concretely and in concert with other actors, to think more deeply about responding to this context of "rightlessness".
Zainab Mohamed
01:13:16
this was really a crisis to us been woman, family stakeholders for both my family and my mothers family because she also depends on me and by the end of the year woman losts her job that really a great disappointment to girls who are in school today and discouragement to the community to send back their girls to school
Zainab Mohamed
01:18:44
I really urge LWF representatives to something on this case woman are very few interms of teaching, we need to be regarded the few of us who came out and decided to be a good example for the rest. In LWF female are not regarded to be administrators and if promoted are demoted again with the reason of others talked about them.
Rachel Silver
01:24:13
Thanks, Esther, for all of your wonderful work checking in on students
zainab bishar
01:25:51
it is God who can only pay for Esther and Misoy they played a great role for many girls to be where they are thanks for your great support
Mirco Stella
01:30:25
I don't think this is on a national level, this is specific to the camps.
Esther Munene
01:32:41
The discussion in Dadaab is not in relation to the effects on girl child education. It is on the effect it’s having on both male and female learners, based on the ‘do no harm’ principle.
dahaho abdi ibrahim
01:34:51
Time for Maqrib Prayer
Hanan Duri
01:35:16
Thank you Dahabo for your participation
Rachel Silver
01:37:40
Thanks, all. In our initial analysis of international and national documents, it is not common to see explicit connections made between austerity measures (specifically, budget cuts that lead to teacher shortages) and girls’ education (as a result of these teacher cuts). That is—clearly the issues connect, but they are not necessarily highlighted.
Esther Munene
01:40:01
There has been intensive sensitization of parents on the importance of girl child education in the Dadaab camps by NGO’s in conjunction with the ministry of education officials. The UNHCR and NGOs realised the need to sensitize them because if the need for education is reinforced at home, the perspective of the community at large towards education changes. More funding to facilitate this is needed.
Sheba Moraa Onchiri
01:42:04
Great point, Damaris on mental support! I am curious, does the Kenyan government help in any way?
Rachel Silver
01:43:21
Sheba—thanks for your question. There are two spaces under discussion here: one, the Dadaab refugee camps, and two, Kenyatta University. The refugee camp space is operated by the UNHCR, with services provided by NGO implementing partners.
Molade Osibodu (she/her/hers)
01:45:50
Our next session will be on Wednesday March 10 on the topic of Intra-Africa Migration and the impact of Covid-19. We hope to see you all there!
Rachel Silver
01:46:04
The Kenyan government is involved in security and has sovereignty over the land, but service provision is managed by the UN (hence Dadaab being a kind of unique space relative to the rest of Kenya). The Kenyan government has threatened to close Dadaab several times in the camps thirty plus year history.
Khadija Nur
01:46:57
Thank you
zainab bishar
01:50:46
dr priscilla you are very helpful and I know most of KU learners appreciate